Without a vaccine for Covid-19, no campus, business, or community is free of the risk of infection.

But early in our work on reopening, we established guiding principles that aim above all else to mitigate risk and protect the most vulnerable in our community while we continue Episcopal’s traditions of academic excellence and a strong residential program.

Education and Engagement

Every student and member of the faculty and staff will sign the #EHSTogether Pledge, committing to following our health and prevention practices for the greater good of the community. See the pledge here.

Before community members return to campus, we will provide information about School health guidelines and prevention practices. This educational material will be offered through:

List of 3 items.

  • Videos, infographics, instructions, and other materials

    provided in an EHS-provided smartphone app being made available to all students, faculty, and staff. (See this Health and Wellness page.)
  • Prevention packs

    with EHS-logo face masks, hand sanitizer, wipes, etc. These will be provided on arrival to campus, though students will be encouraged to bring other masks and supplies.
  • The virtual School orientation

    beginning August 31.

Counseling

EHS counselors have been key players this summer, reviewing reopening plans with an eye to easing student anxiety and helping everyone establish routines and normalcy. The Counseling Center will provide support to students who need help transitioning to school life and the changes on campus. Among other services:

List of 5 items.

  • The counselors will provide virtual and in-person appointments.

    If in person, the appointments will take place in spaces with appropriate physical distancing.
  • Sign-ups for appointments and walk-in services

    will be done online for student convenience.
  • Counselors will arrange telehealth appointments

    with off-campus providers.
  • The Counseling Center will provide extra supports

    for new students, checking in one-on-one and sharing wellness resources.
  • Counselors will also reach out to students learning remotely

    to address their needs.

Prevention

Key to our efforts to mitigate risk is a set of hygiene and prevention practices recommended by health experts who have studied how colleges and schools can best protect their communities. These include:

List of 5 items.

  • Wearing masks

  • Hand hygiene

  • Physical distancing

  • Limits on the size of gatherings

  • Limits on visitors and off-campus activity

During the first few weeks of school, as we establish a healthy baseline for the community through our Covid-19 testing program, we will practice these measures strictly. We hope to ease these measures over time to a more moderate approach, and hopefully relax them further to a point where life on campus approaches normalcy. 

For a discussion of how prevention measures will affect day and overnight leaves and parent visits to campus, see Visitors and Off-Campus Leaves.
Health conditions on campus and regionally will determine how we move through the continuum from strict prevention to more relaxed measures. This chart outlines in brief how prevention efforts would evolve.

Questions

List of 6 frequently asked questions.

  • How will EHS determine when to relax prevention measures following the opening of school?

    Medical Director Dr. Adrianna Bravo and her Health Center team consult regularly with local health authorities regarding health conditions regionally and on campus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other health officials will provide guidance, and we also will consider our own data regarding illness on campus.
  • Will the School provide face masks? (Updated Aug. 6)

    Students will be expected to wear a laundered mask every day and are encouraged to bring masks from home. The School will provide five masks to each students, but we encourage everyone to have at least a week’s supply.

    Please note the following restrictions on masks:
    • Students cannot use gaiter-style masks or bandanas.

    • Masks must be cloth and have ties or ear loops.

    • Art on the masks must meet the guidelines of the Student Handbook for our dress code and room decorations. It must be in good taste and cannot feature the advertisement of drugs or alcohol; sexually suggestive or degrading language or material; language, symbols, or images that may be considered prejudiced or offensive; or language, symbols, or images related to a political figure or party.
  • Can students bring their own masks? (Updated Aug. 6)

    Students will be expected to wear a laundered mask every day and are encouraged to bring masks from home so that they have at least a week’s supply.

    Please note the following restrictions on masks:
    • Students cannot use gaiter-style masks or bandanas.

    • Masks must be cloth and have ties or ear loops.

    • Art on the masks must meet the guidelines of the Student Handbook for our dress code and room decorations. It must be in good taste and cannot feature the advertisement of drugs or alcohol; sexually suggestive or degrading language or material; language, symbols, or images that may be considered prejudiced or offensive; or language, symbols, or images related to a political figure or party.
  • When should students wear face masks?

    Initially, when the community is following strict prevention measures, students should wear face masks at all times indoors except when:
    • Eating 
    • Showering, bathing, or brushing your teeth
    • Sleeping
    Masks are not required if you are:
    • Outdoors alone 
    • Outdoors engaged in school-supervised athletic activity where you are allowed to remove your mask
  • Will students wear masks in their dorm rooms?

    When the community is following strict prevention measures, we encourage students to wear masks as an important means to limit virus transmission. Students are not expected to wear masks when sleeping; curtains will separate beds as an additional measure of prevention.
  • Will students wear masks during athletics?

    Not generally. But if students are working out indoors or if they are doing training that might place them incidentally within six feet of each other, they should wear masks.